Join the FCGH Alliance

FCGH Alliance AimsA few dozen individuals and organizations from around the world have come together to establish a new NGO, the Framework Convention on Global Health Alliance (FCGH Alliance) to make the right to health a reality for everyone. Below are the statutes or articles that will guide the Alliance forward. Membership in the NGO is open to all that agree with these articles. Join the FCGH Alliance — we warmly welcome your participation — contact us
——————————–
Framework Convention on Global Health Alliance
Articles of Association

Name, Headquarters, and Duration
Article 1
The Framework Convention on Global Health Alliance (“Association”) is a non-profit association governed by Articles 60 to 79 of the Swiss Civil Code and by the present Articles of Association. It is neutral politically, non-denominational and acts in the public interest.

Article 2
The Association’s headquarters is located in Geneva, Switzerland. The headquarters can be changed by a decision of the General Assembly. The Association shall be of unlimited duration.

Aims
Article 3
The Association shall pursue the following aims:
— A. To support the development, adoption, ratification, and implementation of the Framework Convention on Global Health (FCGH) as a legally binding global health treaty based on the right to health, aimed at closing national and global health inequities.
— B. To galvanize the participation of a broad alliance of individuals and local, national or international organizations to support the advancement of the FCGH.
— C. To further the realization of the universal right to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health.

Read moreJoin the FCGH Alliance

A Framework Convention on Global Health: A Catalyst for Justice

Catalyst fo justiceA Framework Convention on Global Health: a catalyst for justice

by Michel Sidibé & Kent Buse

Growing inequalities in wealth, gender and disability, as well as in other areas, constitute a grave and unconscionable affront to our common humanity. A mere decade ago, people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were suffering the consequences of gross inequity. Treatment was becoming widespread in developed countries, but in the hardest hit, developing country communities, demands for treatment were met with derision and condescension. Africans, they told us, could barely tell time, let alone adhere to complex regimens. Today, more than 6 million Africans receive treatment for HIV infection and acquired immunodefficiency syndrome (AIDS) and global health leaders have begun to look forward to something formerly unimaginable: an AIDS-free generation.1

An unprecedented bottom-up social movement has made this possible.2  Arguing for the human right to health, advocates for patient rights and other advocacy groups campaigned for universal access to treatment, prevention, care and support for people living with HIV. The first high-level United Nations health summit, held in 2001, was devoted to AIDS,3 and successive high-level meetings on HIV/AIDS in 2006 and 2011 have produced political declarations – a form of soft law – setting out ambitious goals.4 Civil society continues to hold world leaders to account, and in 2012 186 countries have reported on progress towards attaining these goals. Such is the power of political mobilization.

Read moreA Framework Convention on Global Health: A Catalyst for Justice