Come Have A Seat At The Table

Executive Committee
The FCGH Alliance Executive Committee (Partial)

Come have a seat at the table of the Executive Committee of the FCGH Alliance.

The Framework Convention on Global Health (FCGH) is a proposed international treaty, rooted in the right to health, that has been developed by leading health and law experts over the last decade. To advance from an innovative idea to a legally-binding instrument that enables real improvements to the lives of billions of people around the world, a non-profit NGO has recently been created under Swiss civil law. Driven by a diverse and dynamic membership, united for global health justice, the new FCGH Alliance is now activating. You are welcome to participate, meaningfully.

The supreme authority of the FCGH Alliance rests with its General Assembly, comprised of all Alliance members. The day-to-day governing functions and decision-making of the Alliance is delegated to an Executive Committee, whose members and officers are elected by the entire Alliance membership. Executive Committee members come from all over the world and from many walks of life.

The Alliance has committed itself to an Executive Committee that is geographically diverse and, critically, includes people from marginalized communities and with life-threatening disabilities or diseases. The Alliance endeavors to incorporate into its governance and overall operations the right to heath demand of people’s participation, most urgently of people from marginalized communities whose realities are furthest from those promised by the right to health.

If you are interested in participating meaningfully in the FCGH Alliance by ‘having a seat at the table’ of the Executive Committee, contact us right away. There are just a few seats still available at present.

Meet the Executive Committee members

Join a Global Conversation on a New Approach to Reducing Health Inequities

inequityJoin a Global Conversation on a New Approach to Reducing Health Inequities

A version of this post first appeared on the blog of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law.

At the core of the Framework Convention on Global Health (FCGH) is the conviction that today’s health inequities – nationally and globally – are unconscionable but not inevitable. The FCGH could incorporate specific mechanisms for countries to undertake to respond to these inequities, turning right to health (and human rights more broadly) norms of non-discrimination and substantive equality into directives for specific actions, into comprehensive responses. One proposal is that countries develop national health equity strategies. This idea is further explained below, along with information on an upcoming opportunity to you to participate in further solidifying this concept.

Such strategies are rare today. The FCGH could change that. But we need not, cannot, wait until our efforts to create an FCGH come to fruition to begin the process of implementing the measures it might include, such as national health equity strategies. We can begin now to encourage countries to develop such strategies. This would demonstrate their value for global adoption through the FCGH and, even more importantly, would begin to do some of the work of the FCGH — of the right to health, of the demands of justice — today.

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The realities of health inequities may be too well known to shock us any longer. People in richer countries live longer than those in poorer countries. And within countries, people who are rich live longer than people who are poor, people with more education longer than people with little schooling. Practically everywhere, certain populations, like indigenous peoples, fair badly when it comes to the potential to live long, healthy lives.

Yet the tremendous nature of this injustice ought to shock us still. It ought to shock us that the residents of one mostly white suburb of St. Louis can expect to live to be over 91 years old – 35 years more than residents of another St. Louis suburb, where most residents are black. It ought to shock us that South Asian women who are among the poorest segment of the population are almost five times less likely to be attended by a skilled birth attendant – one of the most important interventions for reducing maternal mortality – than they would be if they were part of the wealthiest segment. And it ought to shock us that the TB incidence in Canada’s indigenous Inuit people is more than 270 times that of non-indigenous Canadians.

Read moreJoin a Global Conversation on a New Approach to Reducing Health Inequities

The Power of Law in Achieving Health and Well-Being

Law Health JusticeThe power of law in achieving health and well-being

As someone who studied psychology, I am interested in human behaviour and how we can change it to improve society. So, I’d like to give my perspective of why the Framework Convention on Global Health (FCGH) – a legally binding international treaty – has the potential to change people’s behaviours to help us achieve better health and well-being around the world.

Law is an expression of how we want society to be and, with this in mind, can thus be used as a powerful tool to change culture and behaviour. One could see law as the blueprint for society – the architecture of society and the scaffolding around which living society moulds itself. With such frameworks, we can build better societies where everyone can enjoy scientific and social-political advances. To this end, law is an expression of intent – it is a declaration to say that global civilisation has not yet reached its peak and that there is still so much to achieve; laws can provide what we envision as a better future and how we want to reach it. For example, the idea of an international treaty based on the right to health can slowly change people’s understanding of what norms we want to strive for.

That is not to say that laws are stagnant or perfect. Laws should change with the times. In our globalised world, now more than ever, we need stronger expressions of how we want the world to be. Do we want a world where only a minority of people can access the recent breakthroughs in healthcare? Do we want a world where we value profits over people’s health and well-being? Do we want to live in a world where billions of people are left behind while few enjoy the advances that global civilisation has made over the past centuries?

Law has been, and is still currently, used by powerful actors to cause suffering and hardship; such when limiting the affordability of medicines in some instances. But laws that are formulated with the full participation of citizens – that reflect the real needs of citizens – can be a powerful tool used to enable communities to flourish.

Read moreThe Power of Law in Achieving Health and Well-Being